An introduction to the analysis of deuterinomic history

Introduction and setting 1: Call for response 4:

An introduction to the analysis of deuterinomic history

Introduction and setting 1: Call for response 4: Cities of refuge 4: Foundational Principles of Community 4: Introduction and setting 4: The Commandments at Sinai 5: The Shaping of Community A.

One God, one loyalty 6: Remembering for the future 6: Dangers of pride and arrogance 8: A Community Under God A. Being a holy people Issues of justice and worship Rules for holy war 20 F. Obligations in community Covenant Making and Keeping: Boundaries of Community A.

Covenant of obedience Words of encouragement Concerns for the future Song and Blessing of Moses Moses' death 34 The Book and Its Content The English title of the book, Deuteronomy, comes from the word deuteronomion used as the title of the book in the Septuagint, the second-century BC translation of the Hebrew Scriptures into Greek.

This title, meaning "second law," arose from a misunderstanding of the term in This is actually a much more appropriate title for the book since the "words" of Moses and God are a central feature of the book.

This book is the fifth and final book of the Pentateuch Gk: Deuteronomy is organized as a series of three discourses by Moses 1: These "words" recall the past activities of God in order to build identity for the present community.

The people are then called to continued faithfulness in the future based on that communal identity. This teaching dimension and the resulting theological linking of the community past, present, and future form the literary and theological dynamic of the entire book.

The first discourse 1: The second discourse recounts the giving of the Ten Words Commandments at Sinai. This is followed by an explanation of the first commandment centered around the Shema Deut.

Specific instruction in communal life begins in chapter 12, concluding with a covenant ceremony and homily focusing on their responsibilities to God and each other. The third discourse encapsulates the first two, with a historical review, covenant renewal, admonitions to faithfulness, and warnings of the consequences of disobedience.

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The conclusion includes instructions concerning Moses' successor, final instructions and liturgies, the Song and Blessing of Moses, and his death.Old Testament Introduction () Lecture 7: Historical Books Overview Page 1 of 11 LECTURE 7 HISTORICAL BOOKS OVERVIEW REDEMPTIVE HISTORY INTRODUCTION I.

AUTHOR(S) • The Deuteronomic History: Joshua, Judges, 1&2 Samuel, 1&2 Kings. The Deuteronomistic history theory is currently the most popular (Deuteronomy was originally just the law code and covenant, written to cement the religious reforms of Josiah, and later expanded to stand as the introduction to the full history); but there is an older theory which sees Deuteronomy as belonging to Numbers, and Joshua as a sort of supplement to it.

It is afragmentary history, being a collection of important facts and signal deliverances atdifferent times and in various parts of the land, during the intermediate period of threehundred years between Joshua and the establishment of the monarchy.

Introduction. The Deuteronomistic History (DH) is a modern theoretical construct holding that behind the present forms of the books of Deuteronomy and Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings (the Former. Our History; Statement of Faith and Deuteronomy locates Moses and the Israelites in the territory of Moab in the area where the (see Introduction to. 4 Elliott E. Johnson, 1 Samuel: Synopsis and Selected Analysis, Unpublished class notes in Seminar in Old Testament Historical Literature, 1. 5 Gleason L. Archer, Jr. A Survey of Old Testament Introduction, revised edition, ; see for a good discussion of .

4 Elliott E. Johnson, 1 Samuel: Synopsis and Selected Analysis, Unpublished class notes in Seminar in Old Testament Historical Literature, 1. 5 Gleason L. Archer, Jr.

The Authors of the Deuteronomistic History: Locating a Tradition in Ancient Israel

A Survey of Old Testament Introduction, revised edition, ; see for a good discussion of . Our History; Statement of Faith and Deuteronomy locates Moses and the Israelites in the territory of Moab in the area where the (see Introduction to.

An introduction to the analysis of deuterinomic history

Critically reviewing the presuppositions of scholars reaching back to Martin Noth, and using careful analysis of motif and characterization at each redactional level in each book of the Deuteronomistic History, Peterson asks where we might locate a figure with both motive and opportunity to draw up a proto-narrative including elements of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and the first part of 1 Kings.

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